How to sew pretty, flat necklines every time
Articles Blog

How to sew pretty, flat necklines every time


Hey everyone, you know those lovely ripples
that can be found around the neckline of a dress? Like on this dress, some of my earlier work? Well, this video is a detailed look at how
I get flat, pretty necklines on my dresses. First I cut a 2 inch wide bias strip. I fold and iron this down the middle with
right sides out… so the wrong sides are touching. This saves you from doing the whole fold,
iron, fold and iron thing – seriously, love yourself and don’t do that to yourself. And I’m showing this video on a smocked
dress since those are more difficult to get the neckline pretty. Hey everyone, you know those lovely ripples
that can be found around the neckline of a dress? Like on this dress, some of my earlier
work? Well, this video is a detailed look at how I get flat, pretty necklines on my
dresses. First I cut a 2 inch wide bias strip. I fold
and iron this down the middle with right sides out… so the wrong sides are touching. This
saves you from doing the whole fold, iron, fold and iron thing – seriously, love yourself
and don’t do that to yourself. And I’m showing this video on a smocked
dress since those are more difficult to get the neckline pretty. I’ll match up the raw
edges of the neck bias band with the raw edges of the dress, leaving about a ½” tab, if
you will, sticking out from each end of the neckline. And I’ll sew these together using a 3/8”
of an inch seam allowance. Now, if you’re dealing with a nonsmocked dress, then you’ll
simply snip along the neckline and trim up as needed to make the neckline lay flat and
pretty. However, a smocked neckline is more difficult
so instead, I’ll trim those raw edges just enough so that when the bias band folds over
to the wrong side of the dress, it’s touching the stitches used to secure it. At least that’s the goal. It doesn’t always
happen, sometimes I cut off too much and in those cases, I’ll secure the band by hand
sewing into the pleats below it. But when the band just folds to those stitches,
that allows me to secure the band by hand sewing it into those stitches. That’s the key here to keeping the bias
band “poofed” out, if you will. If it doesn’t have the structure from that fabric
keeping it poofed out, it’ll ripple and look like a hot mess. Now you might be wondering why you can’t
just clip the smocked dresses like how showed the pink neckline earlier? Well.. actually,
to be honest, I began wondering that while I was putting together this video. So I’ve never heard of anyone clipping the
neckline of their bishop before, and all I can think without trying it (sorry but that’s
a lot of fabric to waste), is that is ruins the structure intergrity of the dress… so
it kinda just flops apart. So then I’ll just put my needle through
one of those stitches and then straight up to the neck band. Then at those ends, I turn
that tab into the dress and then go from the stitches to the top of the bias band – I’m
not stitching though any of that tab part and this will allow me to hide that better. Once I tighten those stitches, you can see
it goes into a nice, neat little bundle. So that’s it – now I get flat, ripple-free
necklines every time If you have any questions, please leave them
in the comments below and I’ll do my best to answer them. As always, I appreciate y’all
for watching and hope to catch y’all next time.

5 thoughts on “How to sew pretty, flat necklines every time

  1. The clipping is for the give it produces to prevent puckers.   The  pleated fabric has automatic give and don't need clipped. You are a great teacher!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Back To Top